40 percent of US iPhones are sold to enterprises

Four out of 10 sales of the iPhone are made to enterprise users. When the iPhone came out, what most people heard in the first year from ‘07 to ‘08 was oh my God, it’s not BlackBerry secure. This is not going to work on the enterprise space.

At the end of the day, it’s just software. That’s all it is. And by the time the 3G came out in ‘08 they had solved about 80% of the security issues.

So enterprises today view the iPhone as a mobile computer. It happens to have a voice application on it.

via AT&T exec: 4 out of 10 of our iPhone sales to enterprises | ZDNet.

Compare Apple’s approach to that of Nokia:

Microsoft and Nokia have formed a global alliance to design, develop and market mobile productivity, communications and collaboration solutions.

Under the terms of the agreement, the two companies will begin collaborating immediately on the design, development and marketing of productivity solutions for the mobile professional, bringing Microsoft Office Mobile and Microsoft business communications, collaboration and device management software to Nokia’s Symbian devices.

Who benefits from the shift from business to consumer drivers for technology?

Consumer tastes have overtaken the needs of business as the leading force shaping technology.

via New King of Technology – Apple Overtakes Microsoft – NYTimes.com.

Why is it that other “consumer-oriented” companies like Sony, Nokia and Phillips have not benefitted from this shift?  As far as I can tell they are no better off (and sometimes quite a lot worse off) than Microsoft has been during this transition.

Clearly, although the paradigm did shift to consumers, simply being consumer focused is not enough to benefit from this shift.

Conversely, simply being Enterprise focused (like Cisco or Oracle) has not caused dramatic loss of shareholder value.

Thus the focus is not causal to fortune.

From personal experience I can also recall that precisely at the time when the shift was beginning (think back to when “IT does not matter” was published) at least one of these companies was looking for ways to create “Enterprise Solutions”.

This hints at the cause rooted in strategy, or, more precisely, priorities and the courage to lead.

Instant messaging: AFK

In 2007, 14% of Britons’ online time was spent on IM, according to the UK Online Measurement company – but that has fallen to just 5%, the firm says, basing its findings on the habits of a panel of 40,000 computer users.

The study was released shortly after AOL sold its ICQ instant messaging service $187.5m (£124m) – less than half what the company paid for it in 1998.

And in September 2009, a survey of internet use by the New York-based Online Publishers Association found that the amount of time spent by surfers on traditional communications tools, including IM and e-mail, had declined by 8% since 2003.

via BBC News – Instant messaging: This conversation is terminated.

In other news today Yahoo and Nokia announced a worldwide partnership. Yahoo will provide e-mail and chat services on Nokia phones. The services will be co-branded.

OMG LOL.

Plus ça change, plus c’est la même chose

And so this morning, the handset maker announced another sweeping overhaul of its management structure, its second reorganization in less than a year.

via Nokia Reorgs Evidently Biannual | John Paczkowski | Digital Daily | AllThingsD.

Why Nokia’s board backed the CEO in a stay-the-course strategy

Nokia chairman Jorma Ollila said the company’s management is fully supported by the board

via Nokia board backs CEO, new device strategy | Electronista.

In my assessment of Nokia’s competitive response to the mobile computing disruption I had anticipated an effective re-organziation to begin in 2013, so it came as no surprise that a stay-the-course plan is still being supported at this stage.

This is to be expected because a disruption, by definition, discourages a symmetric response from the incumbents.  Indeed, management would face serious scrutiny and probable dismissal if they did address the challenge head on. A symmetric response would begin with a declaration that the entire asset base of the company is a sunk cost to be written off.  That would include its products, distribution network, development processes, resources and priorities.  Such a response can only come about from a near-death experience.

You can certainly see the dilemma: It would be absurd for management to declare that their top rank position in the mobile phone market is an undesirable situation to be in.  It would be even more absurd if they suggested scrapping their entire world-leading volume business to re-focus on a new business–doing basically what Motorola has done when they were facing oblivion.  The chances are, however, that this is precisely what needs to be done, and the sooner the better.

So being sensible is the path always chosen.  Being bat-shit crazy is not an endorsable strategy.

Essentially, management is paid and incentivized to protect an eroding asset, not to destroy and replace it.

Espoo, we have a problem.

Poor quality of Nokia software is source of astonishment for market analysts.

Helsingin Sanomat – International Edition – Business & Finance — Analysts: Nokia has wasted 3 years trying to come up with challenger to iPhone.

A queue is forming to get on board the clue train but, instead of getting in line, Finland seems to be sitting and watching incredulously how the line grows.

The Finnish newspaper article continues:

The media often takes a blindly uncritical view of all Apple’s doings, such that the positive attention paid to the company’s products is in no way proportionate to the weight of the products themselves.

A good example is Apple’s iPad tablet, the commercial success of which is still a large question-mark. This has nevertheless not prevented journalists over the Atlantic from writing profusely and ecstatically about the newcomer.

If Nokia keep believing this their competitiveness problem will surely not go away.
Additional thoughts on the likely response process from Nokia here.

RIM now ranked 4th, Apple 6th in phone market shares

First quarter market share ranking of top mobile phone vendors according to Strategy Analytics:

  1. Nokia, 107.8 million
  2. Samsung, 64.3
  3. LG, 27.1
  4. RIM, 10.6
  5. Sony Ericsson, 10.5
  6. Apple 8.75
  7. Motorola, 8.5

These numbers are shipments or sell-in, which may differ from sell-through or end-user purchases.

RIM breaks into top 5 in surging phone market | Reuters.